Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp <p><strong> </strong></p> <ul> <li class="show"><strong>ISSN electrónico: </strong>2256-2958</li> <li class="show"><strong>Periodicidad:</strong> Trimestral</li> <li class="show"><strong>Creative Commons:</strong> <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/co/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">by-nc-sa</a></li> </ul> en-US <p style="font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; margin: 1em 0px; color: #111111; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11.2px;">The authors enable RCCP to reprint the material published in it.</p> <p style="font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; margin: 1em 0px; color: #111111; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11.2px;">The journal allows the author(s) to hold the copyright without restrictions, and will allow the author(s) to retain publishing rights without restrictions.</p> revistaedianimal@udea.edu.co (Editor-in-chief: Jorge Agudelo, PhD) revistaedianimal@udea.edu.co (Gustavo García-Henao) Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 -0500 OJS 3.3.0.13 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Effect of increasing levels of Chlorella spp. on the in vitro fermentation and methane production of a corn silage-based diet https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354301 <p class="Default" style="margin-bottom: 10.0pt; text-align: justify; line-height: 150%;"><strong>Background: </strong>Generally, the forages used in cow-calf and backgrounding cattle operations have low crude protein and high fiber concentration, limiting animal performance and increasing greenhouse gas emissions. <em>Chlorella </em>spp., a green micro-alga, shows promising potential to provide nutrients, especially nitrogen, to low-protein diets. However, information is limited regarding the effects of <em>Chlorella </em>spp. on the <em>in vitro </em>fermentation and methane (CH4) production of diets. <strong>Objective: </strong>To evaluate the effects of increasing inclusion levels of algae (<em>Chlorella </em>spp.) on ruminal <em>in vitro </em>fermentation profile and CH4 production of a corn silage-based diet. <strong>Methods: </strong>Incubations were conducted on three separate days using corn silage and gin trash as substrate (70:30 ratio, respectively). Treatments were control (without algae) and 1, 5, and 10% of algae inclusion in the substrate replacing the basal diet. Ruminal fluid was collected from two ruminally cannulated Angus crossbred steers fed <em>ad libitum </em>a corn silage and gin trash diet. Final pH, concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), <em>in vitro </em>organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), total gas, and CH4 production were determined after 24 h of incubation. Variables were evaluated. using the MIXED procedure of SAS software, and means were compared using orthogonal polynomial contrasts. <strong>Results: </strong>Algae inclusion linearly increased (p&lt;0.01) the IVOMD. However, the final pH and concentration of VFA and NH3-N did not differ (p&gt;0.05) among algae levels. Molar proportion of VFA and the acetate:propionate ratio was not affected (p&gt;0.05) by increasing algae inclusion. Finally, total gas and CH4 production were not different (p&gt;0.05) among treatments. <strong>Conclusion: </strong>The inclusion of <em>Chlorella </em>spp. does not modify the ruminal <em>in vitro </em>fermentation profile nor the CH4 production of a corn silage-based diet.</p> Juan de J Vargas, Federico Tarnonsky, Araceli Maderal, Ignacio Fernández-Marenchino, Federico Podversich, Tessa M Schulmeister, Nicolás DiLorenzo Copyright (c) 2021 Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354301 Thu, 13 Jul 2023 00:00:00 -0500 Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii in vaginal swabs from aborted cattle in Mexico https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354421 <p><strong>Background: </strong><em>Coxiella burnetii </em>is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes Q fever, a worldwide contagious and zoonotic disease. Q fever is primarily transmitted to humans by infected cattle, sheep, and goats. Ruminants do not always develop clinical signs, except for pregnant females, which can present reproductive failure such as abortions and stillbirths. Regardless of its worldwide distribution, in Mexico this is considered an exotic disease, although serological evidence of <em>C. burnetii </em>has been demonstrated and at least six confirmed human cases have been reported. <strong>Objective: </strong>To assess the presence of <em>C. burnetii </em>in cattle in Mexico. <strong>Methods: </strong>Genomic DNA was extracted from 153 vaginal swabs obtained from cattle dwelling in 12 Mexican states and analyzed by PCR. <strong>Results: </strong>The <em>C. burnetii </em>IS<em>1111 </em>insertion sequence was identified by endpoint PCR in 33.33% (51/153) of the vaginal swabs. We obtained two nucleotide sequences that confirmed the genetic material of <em>C. burnetii</em>. <strong>Conclusion: </strong>Our results constitute a first step to elucidate the current epidemiology of Q fever in our country, and they indicate that cattle may be a reservoir of <em>C. burnetii</em>. To the best of our knowledge, this report provides the first molecular proof that this pathogen exists among cattle in Mexico.</p> Carlos Flores-Pérez, Efrén Díaz-Aparicio, Erika Gabriela Palomares-Resendiz, José Luis Gutiérrez-Hernández, Enrique Herrera-López, Rigoberto Hernández-Castro Copyright (c) 2021 Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354421 Wed, 26 Jul 2023 00:00:00 -0500 Carcass characteristics and meat quality of Holstein bulls depending on slaughter age and muscle types https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/353690 <p><strong>Background: </strong>Among non-genetic factors, slaughter age is the most significant aspect influencing meat quality traits and quantity of beef. <strong>Objective: </strong>To compare the effects of slaughter age and muscle type on carcass traits and meat quality of Holstein bulls. <strong>Methods: </strong>A total of 30 Holstein Friesian bulls were slaughtered at different age, as follows: Young group (YG) at 18 months (n=14 animals); and Old group (OG) at 24 months of age (n=16 animals). Carcass and meat quality traits of longissimus dorsi (LD) and gluteus medius (GM) muscles were evaluated. <strong>Results: </strong>Carcass traits were not significantly affected over time. Although carcass fat measurements -such as marbling score, back fat thickness, European Beef Carcass Classification System (SEUROP) fatness score- increased numerically with greater slaughter age, only the increase in percentage of kidney, pelvic, and heart (KPH) fat contents were significant (p&lt;0.05). Bulls slaughtered at 24 months had 13.4% greater (p&lt;0.01) LD area than those in the YG group. Bulls in the OG group had significantly (p&lt;0.01) higher slaughter weight as well as hot and cold carcass weights. However, percentages of hot and cold carcass dressing were not significantly affected by slaughter age. The L* (lightness), a* (redness), b* (yellowness), chroma (color intensity), and hue values of meat in the OG group did not differ from those in the YG group. However, L*, a* and chroma values of GM muscle were higher than those of LD muscle, while the pH24 value of GM muscle was significantly (p&lt;0.01) higher than that of LD. <strong>Conclusion: </strong>It seems more advantageous to slaughter bulls at 24 months of age to get heavier, more marbled, and muscled carcasses better suited to current consumer expectations.</p> Abdulkerim Diler, Mete Yanar, Recep Aydın, Veysel Fatih Özdemir, Şeyma Şişik Oğraş, Rıdvan Koçyiğit Copyright (c) 2021 Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/353690 Wed, 24 May 2023 00:00:00 -0500 Characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Moraxella ovis isolates from clinical cases of contagious ovine keratoconjunctivitis in Mexico State, Mexico https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354618 <p class="Pa19" style="margin-bottom: 10.0pt; text-align: justify; line-height: 150%;"><strong><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; color: black;">Background: </span></strong><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; color: black;">Contagious ovine keratoconjunctivitis (OKC) causes blindness in sheep and goats and it is associated with a set of bacterial genera of which some species show antimicrobial resistance. <strong>Objective: </strong>To identify phenotypic-genotypic relationship of antimicrobial resistance from <em>Moraxella </em>spp. isolates obtained from clinical cases of contagious ovine keratoconjunctivitis (OKC) in Mexico. <strong>Methods: </strong>A total of 209 samples were obtained from clinical cases of OKC in sheep and 60 <em>Moraxella ovis </em>isolates were identified by bacteriological techniques and amplification of <em>16s rRNA </em>and <em>rtxA </em>genes by PCR. All isolates were evaluated in terms of antimicrobial resistance by the disk diffusion susceptibility test and amplification of resistance genes by PCR. <strong>Results: </strong>We found 14 <em>Moraxella ovis </em>isolates with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and five multiresistant (MDR). The <em>sul1, sul</em>2<em>, tetB, qnrA, qnrB, Bla</em>TEM genes of antimicrobial resistance were amplified, while gene <em>floR </em>was not amplified. <strong>Conclusion: </strong>This is the first isolation report of <em>Moraxella ovis </em>from ocular lesions in sheep in the State of Mexico, with six antimicrobial resistance genes identified. Results suggest that <em>Moraxella ovis </em>plays an important role in the course of the disease and provides a panorama for molecular epidemiological surveillance and bacterial resistance.</span></p> Giovany Ortiz-Arana, Martín Talavera-Rojas, Edgardo Soriano-Vargas, Erika Gabriela Palomares-Reséndiz, Edgar Enríquez-Gómez, Celene Salgado-Miranda, Jorge Acosta-Dibarrat Copyright (c) 2021 Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354618 Mon, 14 Aug 2023 00:00:00 -0500 Fermentative profile, chemical composition, in vitro gas production and ruminal degradation kinetics of sugarcane silages associated with different levels of butterfly pea hay https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354279 <p><strong>Background: </strong>The ensiling process of sugarcane promotes yeast proliferation during fermentation, requiring the use of additives. <em>Clitorea ternatea </em>can be used as a natural additive in sugarcane silages to reduce dry matter losses and modifying the fermentation profile of the silage. <strong>Objective: </strong>To evaluate the fermentative profile, chemical composition, <em>in vitro </em>gas production and ruminal degradation kinetics of sugarcane silages associated with different levels of butterfly pea hay. <strong>Methods: </strong>Increasing levels of butterfly pea hay (0, 10, 20, and 30% on dry matter basis) were added to sugarcane silages. A completely randomized design was adopted, with four treatments and four repetitions, totaling 16 experimental silos that were opened after 60 days of ensiling. <strong>Results: </strong>Positive changes were observed in terms of fermentative losses, fermentative profile, chemical composition, <em>in vitro </em>gas production, and ruminal degradation kinetics with the addition of butterfly pea hay to sugarcane silage (p&lt;0.05). <strong>Conclusion: </strong>The inclusion of up to 20% butterfly pea hay in sugarcane silage reduces fermentation losses and improves silage quality, such as increase in protein and energy content and reduction of the fibrous fractions of the silage, making silage an excellent ingredient to be included in ruminant diets.</p> Ery J Nascimento-Ramos, Bruno A Souza-Almeida, Glayciane Costa-Gois, Daniel Ribeiro-Menezes, Ana P Ribeiro-Silva, Timóteo S Santos-Nunes, Mário A Ávila- Queiroz Copyright (c) 2021 Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/rccp/article/view/354279 Tue, 11 Jul 2023 00:00:00 -0500