Histopathologic characterization of the reproductive organs of heifers experimentally infected with Campylobacter fetus venerealis

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.rccp.v33n1a05

Keywords:

Campylobacter fetus venerealis, cattle, heifers, histopathology, lymphocytic inflammation, oviduct, postmating infection, uterus, vagina, venereal disease

Abstract

Background: Bovine campylobacteriosis is a venereal disease due to infection with Campylobacter fetus venerealis. It causes mainly reproductive failures that lead to considerable economic losses. Objective: To perform a histopathological description of the mucosa from reproductive organs of heifers experimentally infected with Campylobacter fetus venerealis. Methods: Twelve 15-18-months-old Aberdeen Angus heifers were treated for estrous synchronization and exposed to natural breeding. They were then randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=9) was inoculated with C. fetus venerealis; group B (n=3, control) was inoculated with a placebo. Ultrasonography was performed at days 29, 38, and 42 post-breeding, and plasmatic progesterone levels were quantified using ELISA to confirm pregnancies. Animals in group A with plasma progesterone levels below 1 ng/mL and/or diagnosed as non-pregnant were further divided into three subgroups: A1 (n=4), euthanized at day 30 post-breeding; A2 (n=3), euthanized at day 40 post-breeding and A3 (n=2), euthanized at day 55 postbreeding. Heifers from group B, all diagnosed as pregnant, were euthanized each at day 30, 40, and 55 days post-breeding as well. Histological sections from every group were taken from oviducts, uterus, and vagina. Results: Lymphocytic inflammation was the most common lesion in all infected heifers. Trophoblast cells were found in the non-pregnant heifers euthanized at days 40, and 55 post-breeding. The inflammatory process with the presence of lymphoid cells probably altered the balance in the activity of maternal lymphoid cells, as well as gene expression of the trophoblast, finally affecting the embryo survival. Conclusion: This work contributes to the understanding of the histopathological process involved in post-mating infection of Campylobacter fetus bovine.

|Abstract
= 518 veces | HTML
= 6 veces| | PDF
= 480 veces|

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

María Giobergia, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province

Infectious Diseases Area, SAMP-CIVETAN Department, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province (UNCPBA), Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina. National Interuniversity Council Scholarship, Argentina.

 

Marcela Herrera, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province

Morphological Sciences Area, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province, UNCPBA, Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Miriam Teruel, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province

Morphological Sciences Area, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province (UNCPBA), Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Belén Riccio, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province

Pathology Area, FISFARVET-CIVETAN, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province (UNCPBA), Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Maria Catena, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province

Pathology Area, FISFARVET-CIVETAN, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, National University of the Center of the Buenos Aires Province (UNCPBA), Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

References

Barbeito C. Historia de las placentas y su relación con la morfología. Cs Morfol 2014; 10:1-15.

Bartolomé J. Endocrinología y fisiología de la gestación y el parto en el bovino. Taurus 2009; 11:20-28.

Beer A, Billingham R. Maternal immunological recognition mechanism during pregnancy. Ciba Found Symp 1979; 64:293-322.

Blaser MJ, Pei Z. Pathogenesis of Campylobacter fetus Infections: Critical Role of High-Molecular- Weight S-Layer Proteins in Virulence. J Inf Dis 1993; 167:372-377.

Brenner DJ, Staley JT. Familia Campylobacteraceae. Género Campylobacter. In: Staley JT, Boon DR, Brenner DJ, De Vos P, Garrity GM, Goodfellow M, Krieg NR, Rainey FA, Schleifer K, editors. Bergey ́s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. New York: Springer; 2005. p.1145-63.

Casadevall C, Pirofski LA. Host-pathogen interactions: basic concepts of microbial commensalism, colonization, infection, and disease. Infect Immun 2000; 68:6511-6518.

Catena M, Callejas S, Soto P, Aba M, Echevarría H, Monteavaro C, Mazzolli A. Efectos de la infección experimental con Campylobacter fetus venerealis sobre la preñez temprana en vaquillonas. In Vet 2003; 5:37-44.

Catena M, Chiapparrone L, Morán P, Pasucci J, Echevarría H, Monteavaro C, Soto P. Adhesión de Campylobacter fetus venerealis a células vaginales y endometriales de bovinos. Rev Arg Microbiol 2007; 39:174-175.

Clark B. Review of bovine vibriosis. Aust Vet J 1971; 47:103-107. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.1971.tb14749.x

Croy B, Wessels J, Linton N, Tayade C. Comparison of immune cell recruitment and function in endometrium during development of epitheliochorial (pig) and hemochorial (mouse and human) placentas. Placenta 2009; 23:23-31.DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2008.09.019

de Moraes Pinto L, Ambrósio C, Goncalves Teiceira D, Cardoso Araújo K, Kfoury Júnior J, Morini Júnior J, Caroprezo Morini A, Grassi Risi R, Bolzani de Campos Ferreira G, dos Santos Martins D, Miglino M. Comportamento das células trofoblásticas gigantes na placenta de vacas Nelore (Bos Indicus – Linnaeus 1758). Rev Bras Reprod Anim 2008; 32:110-121.

Gorkiewicz G, Kienesberger S, Schober C, Scheicher S R, Gülly C, Zechner R, Zechner EL. A genomic island defines subspecies-specific virulence features of the host-adapted pathogen Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis. J Bacteriol 2010; 192:502-517.DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/JB.00803-09

Hansen PJ. To be or not to be–determinants of embryonic survival following heat shock. Theriogenology 2007; 68:40-48. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2007.03.013

Hoffer M. Bovine Campylobacteriosis: A review. Can Vet J 1981; 22:327-330.

Hu L, Kopecko D. Interactions of Campylobacter with eukaryotic cells: gut luminal colonization and mucosal invasion mechanisms. In: Nachamkin I, Blaser M, editors. Campylobacter. Washington DC: ASM Press; 2000. p.191-217.DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00055-07

Kaakoush NO, Castaño-Rodríguez N, Mitchell HM, Ming Man S. Global Epidemiology of Campylobacter Infection. Clin Microbiol Rev 2015; 28:687-720.DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00006-15

Takahashi H, Haneda S, Kayano M, Matsui M. Differences in progesterone concentrations and mRNA expressions of progesterone receptors in bovine endometrial tissue between the uterine horns ipsilateral and contralateral to the corpus luteum. J Vet Med Sc 2016; 78:613-618.DOI: https://doi.org/10.1292/jvms.15-0366

Terzolo H, Catena M. Género Campylobacter. In: Stanchi N, Martino PE, Enso EG, Reinoso H, Echeverría MG, Leardini NA, Copes JA, editors. Microbiología Veterinaria. Buenos Aires: Intermédica SAICI; 2010. p.274-80.

Ware D. Pathogenicity of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in causing infertility in cattle. Br Vet J 1980; 136:301-303. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0007-1935(17)32297-2

Downloads

Published

2019-11-05

How to Cite

Giobergia, M., Herrera, M., Teruel, M., Riccio, B., & Catena, M. (2019). Histopathologic characterization of the reproductive organs of heifers experimentally infected with Campylobacter fetus venerealis. Revista Colombiana De Ciencias Pecuarias, 33(3), 149–158. https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.rccp.v33n1a05

Issue

Section

Original research articles

Similar Articles

> >> 

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.