Effects of genetic polymorphism in Pit1, GH, GHR and KCN3 on milk yield and body weight of Khuzestan (Iran) water buffaloes

  • Meysam Ahmadzadeh Islamic Azad University
  • Farzad Rashidi Islamic Azad University
  • Hamed Amirpour Najafabadi Lincoln University
  • Amir Jaferian Ramin University of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Shahin Eghbalsaied Islamic Azad University
Keywords: animal breeding, casein, genetic variation, growth hormone, milk production, SNP

Abstract

Background: Genetic information is necessary to devise strategic plans aimed to improve the genetic merit of buffalos. Objective: To assess the effect of genetic polymorphisms in GH, Pit-1, GHR, GHRHR, and KCN3 genes on milk production and body weight of Khuzestan water buffaloes. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 60 buffaloes from the Khuzestan province, Iran. Using the PCR-RFLP technique, the amplified and digested fragments of GH/AluI, GHR/AluI, GHRHR/ HaeIII, Pit1/HinfI, and KCN3/HindIII were genotyped. Results: All animals were monomorphic for GHRHR. The frequency of mutant alleles for GH, GHR, KCN3, and Pit1 was 47.5, 74.2, 49.2, and 51.7%, respectively. There were significant differences (p<0.0001) in the genotypic frequencies of GH, GHR, and Pit1 between high and low milk-yielding buffaloes. The GH (p=0.0002), GHR (p<0.0001) and Pit1 (p<0.0001) polymorphisms also had significant effects on body weight. Sequencing results revealed the presence of C496A, G495A, G498A and C1501T SNPs in the GH, and G1702T in the GHR gene of Khuzestan buffalos. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of GH, GHR, and Pit1 on milk production and body weight of Khuzestan buffaloes. The results suggest that devising an integrated breeding plan in Khuzestan water buffalos can considerably benefit from the very high diversity in candidate genes.

|Abstract
= 164 veces | PDF
= 198 veces|

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Meysam Ahmadzadeh, Islamic Azad University
  • Transgenesis Center of Excellence, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran.
  • Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran.
Farzad Rashidi, Islamic Azad University
  • Transgenesis Center of Excellence, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran.
  • Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan
Hamed Amirpour Najafabadi, Lincoln University

Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand

Amir Jaferian, Ramin University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Department of Animal Science, Ramin University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Mollasani, Ahvaz, Khuzestan, Iran.

Shahin Eghbalsaied, Islamic Azad University
  • Transgenesis Center of Excellence, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran
  • Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Isfahan (Khorasgan) branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran
  • Institute of Farm Animal Genetics, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Mariensee, Neustadt am Rübenberge, Germany
Published
2019-05-17
Section
Original research articles