Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from spray-chilled sheep carcasses during cooling

Authors

  • Karina A. Mateus Santa Catarina State University
  • Moisés R. dos Santos Santa Catarina State University
  • Jocelita de Lima Santa Catarina State University
  • Lucine F. de Bona Santa Catarina State University
  • Maria S. T. dos Santos Santa Catarina State University
  • Arnildo Korb Santa Catarina State University
  • Jackeline K. Kirinus Santa Catarina State University
  • Julcemar D. Kessler Santa Catarina State University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.rccp.v34n2a04

Keywords:

antimicrobial, antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic, bacterial resistance, carcass, enterobacteria, Escherichia coli, microbial resistance, multi-resistant organism, multidrog resistance, public health, sheep, slaughter, spray-chilled, spray-chilling

Abstract


Background: Multidrug-resistant bacteria present in food of animal origin raise human and animal health concerns. Objective: To assess antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from sheep carcasses subjected to spray-chilling with water (4 and 10 hours) during cooling. Methods: Thirty surface swabs were collected from carcasses before and after the last water spray in two slaughter periods. In a first assessment (1st sampling), three spray-chilled carcasses (4 hours), three non-sprayed and one control carcass were sampled. In a second assessment (2nd sampling), the same number of carcasses and treatments were maintained, but spray-chilling was extended to 10 hours. All samples collected were isolated and submitted to susceptibility test using 16 (1st sampling) and 17 (2nd sampling) antimicrobials, respectively. Results: Overall, E. coli isolates were resistant most antimicrobials. Spray-chilled and control carcasses (10 hours) showed resistance to meropenem. Conclusion: E. coli isolates from carcasses subjected to spray-chilling with water for 10 hours had higher antimicrobial resistance to one, two, and four antimicrobial classes, characterizing a multidrug resistance profile. These results highlight the need to monitor health status throughout the meat production processes.

|Abstract
= 213 veces | PDF
= 178 veces|

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Karina A. Mateus, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2828-9315
Research Group Production, Carcasses and Meat, Department of Zootechnics, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Moisés R. dos Santos, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6808-420X
Research Group Production, Carcasses and Meat, Department of Zootechnics, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Jocelita de Lima, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7500-2463
Research Group Production, Carcasses and Meat, Department of Zootechnics, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Lucine F. de Bona, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-4800
Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Nursing, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Maria S. T. dos Santos, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5053-5108
Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Nursing, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Arnildo Korb, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7333-0754
Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Nursing, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Jackeline K. Kirinus, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9381-0122
Research Group Production, Carcasses and Meat, Department of Zootechnics, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

Julcemar D. Kessler, Santa Catarina State University

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2187-8827
Research Group Production, Carcasses and Meat, Department of Zootechnics, Santa Catarina State University, Chapecó, Brazil.

References

Arslan S, Eyi A. Occurrence and microbial resistance profiles of Salmonella species in retail meat products. J Food Protect 2010; 73(9):1613–1617. DOI:https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X-73.9.1613

Barros MFA, Nero LA, Monteiro AA, Beloti V. Identification of main contamination points by hygiene indicator microorganisms in beef processing plants. Ciênc Tecnol Aliment 2007; 27(4):856–862. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0101-20612007000400028

Bauer AW, Kirby WMM, Sherris JC, Turck M. Antibiotic susceptibility testing by a standardized single disk method. Amer J Clin Pathol 1966; 45(4):493–496. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/45.4_ts.493

Borch E, Arinder P. Bacteriological safety issues in beef and ready-to-eat meat products, as well as control measures. Meat Sci 2002; 62(3):381–390. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0309-1740(02)00125-0

CLSI. Performance standards for antimicrobial disk susceptibility tests; approved standard – eleventh edition. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 2015. DOI:https://clsi.org/media/1631/m02a12_sample.pdf

Dontorou C, Papadopoulou C, Filioussis G, Economou V, Apostolou I, Zakkas GA, Salamoura A, Kansouzidou A, Levidiotou S. Isolation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from foods in Greece. Int J Antimicrob Ag 2003; 82(3):273–279. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1605(02)00313-6

Jones SDM, Robertson WM. The effects of spray-chilling carcasses on shrinkage and quality of beef. Meat Sci1988; 24(3):177–188. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/0309-1740(88)90076-9

Krumperman PH. Multiple antibiotic resistance indexing of Escherichia coli to identify high-risk sources of fecal contamination of foods. Appl Environ Microbiol 1983; 46(1):165–1670. DOI: https://doi.org/0099-2240/83/070165-06$02.00/0

Lenahan M, Crowley H, O’Brien SB, Byrne C, Sweeney T, Sheridan JJ. The potential use of chilling to control the growth of Enterobacteriaceae on porcine carcasses and the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 in pigs. J Appl Microbiol 2009; 106(5):1512–1520. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.04112.x

Lerma LL, Benomar N, Knapp CW, Galeote DC, Gálvez A, Abriouel, HLC. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products. Plos One 2014; 9(12):1–17. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0114252

Lindgren PK, Karlsson Å, Hughes D. Mutation rate and evolution of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from patients with urinary tract infections. Antimicrob Agents Ch 2003; 47(10):3222–3232. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.47.10.3222-3232.2003

Magiorako AP, Srinivasan A, Carey RB, Carmeli Y, Falagas ME, Giske CG, Harbarth S, Hindler JF, Kahlmeter G, Olsson-Liljequist B, Paterson DL, Arroz LB, Stelling J, Struelens MJ, Vatopoulos A, Weber JT, Monnet DL. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance. Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18(3):268–281. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03570.x

Miró E, Sabaté M, Navarro F, Vergés C, Aliaga R, Mirelis B, Prats G. β-lactamases involved in resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Clinical isolates collected between 1994 and 1996, in Barcelona (Spain). J Antimicrob Chemother 2002; 49(6):989-997. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkf057

NZFSA. Sampling DRAFT Schedule 1: Technical procedures for the national microbiological database. 2008;50-60. URL: https://www.nzfsa.govt.nz/animalproducts/publications/manualsguides/nmd/nmd-tech-proced/checksheets/nmdchecklistguidelines.pdf

O’Brien TF. Emergence, spread, and environmental effect of antimicrobial resistance: How use of an antimicrobial anywhere can increase resistance to any antimicrobial anywhere else. Clin Infect Dis 2002; 34(3):78–84. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/340244

Ockerman HW, Basu L. Carcass chilling and boning. In: J. Werner Klinth (1 Ed.), Encyclopedia of Meat Sciences: Oxford: Elsevier; 2004;148–149.

Oliver SP, Murinda SE, Jayarao BM. Impact of antibiotic use in adult dairy cows on antimicrobial resistance of veterinary and human pathogens: A comprehensive review. Foodborne Pathog Dis 2011; 8(3):337–355. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2010.0730

Phillips I, Casewell M, Cox T, De Groot B, Friis C, Jones R, Nightingale C , Preston R, Waddell J. Does the use of antibiotics in food animals pose a risk to human health? A critical review of published data. J Antimicrob Chemother 2004; 23(1):28–52. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkg483

Rahamathulla MP, Harish BN, Mataseje L, Mulvey MR. Carbapenem resistance mechanisms among blood isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Afr J Microbiol Res 2016; 10(2):45-53. DOI:https://doi.org/10.5897/AJMR2015.7802

Rasmussen BA, Bush K, Keeney D, Yang Y, Hare R, O'Gara C, Medeiros AA. Characterization of IMI-1 β -Lactamase, a Class A Carbapenem Hydrolyzing Enzyme from Enterobacter cloacae. Antimicrob Agents Ch 1996; 40(3):2080–2086. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.40.9.2080

Sáenz Y, Zarazaga M, Briñas L, Lantero M, Ruiz-Larrea F, Torres C. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolates obtained from animals, foods and humans in Spain. Int J Antimicrob Ag 2001; 18(4):353–358. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0924-8579(01)00422-8

Safdar N, Maki DG. The commonality of risk factors for nosocomial colonization and infection with antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, gram-negative bacilli, Clostridium difficile, and Candida. Ann Intern Med 2002; 136(11):834–844. DOI:https://doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-136-11-200206040-00013

Santos NQ. Bacterial resistance in the context of hospital infection. Texto Contexto Enferm 2004; 13(1):64-70. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0104-07072004000500007

Stapleton PD, Shannon KP, French GL. Carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli associated with plasmid-determined CMY-4 β-Lactamase production and loss of an outer membrane protein. Antimicrob Agents Ch 1999; 43 (5):1206–1210. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.43.5.1206

Strahilevitz J, Jacoby GA, Hooper DC, Robicsek A. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance: a multifaceted threat. Clin Microbiol Rev 2009; 22(4):4664–6891. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00016-09

Strydom PE, Buys EM. The effects of spray-chilling on carcass mass loss and surface associated bacteriology. Meat Sci 1995; 39(2):265–276. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/0309-1740(88)90076-9

Van Boeckel TP, Brower C, Gilbert M, Grenfella BT, Levina SA, Robinsoni TP, Teillant A, Laxminarayan R. Global trends in antimicrobial use in food animals. PNAS 2015; 112 (18):5649–5654. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1503141112

Downloads

Published

2020-07-22

How to Cite

Mateus, K. A., dos Santos, M. R., de Lima, J., de Bona, L. F., dos Santos, M. S. T., Korb, A., Kirinus, J. K., & Kessler, J. D. (2020). Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from spray-chilled sheep carcasses during cooling. Revista Colombiana De Ciencias Pecuarias, 34(1), 63–72. https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.rccp.v34n2a04

Issue

Section

Original research articles