Antimicrobial activity of acetic acid and colgate 360° antibacterial toothbrush®: an in vitro study

  • Laura Viviana Herrera-Sandoval Universidad Industrial de Santander
  • Stephanny Gissell Caballero-Romero Universidad Santo Tomás
  • Andrea Claro-Numa Universidad Santo Tomás
  • Harold Torres-Pinzón Universidad Santo Tomás
  • Carmen Alodia Martínez-López Universidad Santo Tomás
Keywords: Acetic acid, Desinfection, Tooth brushing, Antimicrobial substance, Oral cavity

Abstract

Introduction: toothbrushes may become a potential source of oral pathogens when not properly disinfected once they have been used, especially in patients with infections of the stomatognathic system or among populations that do not often replace this instrument. The goal of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of 5% acetic acid with that of Colgate 360º antibacterial toothbrush® as possible strategies for toothbrush disinfection. Methods: this study included 48 toothbrush heads that were separately inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Cándida albicans. The heads were sorted out into three groups: heads treated with 5% acetic acid (white domestic vinegar, La Constancia®) for 10 minutes; 360º toothbrush heads with antibacterial properties, and control heads treated with saline solution. This was followed by calculations of CFU/ml of the microorganism remaining in the heads after treatment or time of action. Results: in presence of S. aureus, Colgate 360º antibacterial toothbrush® proved to have better antimicrobial activity than 5% acetic acid (PI:72.11 5). The two assessed treatments showed a similar capacity to eradicate S. mutans from the brush heads (p> 0,05); concerning C. albicans, the best antimicrobial activity was observed in the 5% acetic acid (PI: 99,9%). Conclusion: in vitro,
both white domestic vinegar and Colgate 360º antibacterial toothbrush® remove microorganisms colonizing toothbrush heads, such as S. aureus, S. mutans y C. albicans, and are therefore considered good alternatives for keeping toothbrushes free of microoorganisms among several populations.

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Author Biographies

Laura Viviana Herrera-Sandoval, Universidad Industrial de Santander

Bacteriologist - Clinical Laboratory Technologist, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Basic Biomedical Sciences Msc, Universidad Indus-trial de Santander, Professor at undergraduate level, Universidad Santo Tomás. Coordinator of the Basic Sciences Laboratory at Universidad Santo Tomás. Researcher of the Stomatognathic System Research Group-Colciencias

Stephanny Gissell Caballero-Romero, Universidad Santo Tomás

Dentist, Universidad Santo Tomás. Researcher of the Stomatognathic System Research Group-Colciencias.

Andrea Claro-Numa, Universidad Santo Tomás

Dentist, Universidad Santo Tomás

Harold Torres-Pinzón, Universidad Santo Tomás

Dentist, Universidad Santo Tomás, Epidemiologist, Universidad del Bosque; Professor at undergraduate and graduate levels, Universidad Santo Tomás. Magister Candidate, Dental Sciences, Universidad CES. Researcher of the Stomatognathic System Research Group-Colciencias

Carmen Alodia Martínez-López, Universidad Santo Tomás

Dentist, Universidad Santo Tomás, Specialist in Maxillary Orthopedics Universidad Antonio Nariño, Professor at undergraduate level, Universidad Santo Tomás. Researcher of the Research Group Sistema Integral Bucal —SIB—. Chemistry-Biology BA, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia.

Published
2012-11-29
How to Cite
Herrera-Sandoval L. V., Caballero-Romero S. G., Claro-Numa A., Torres-Pinzón H., & Martínez-López C. A. (2012). Antimicrobial activity of acetic acid and colgate 360° antibacterial toothbrush®: an in vitro study. Revista Facultad De Odontología Universidad De Antioquia, 24(1), 62-75. Retrieved from https://revistas.udea.edu.co/index.php/odont/article/view/10842