Effectiveness of application of a manual for improvement of alarms management by nurses in Intensive Care Units

Authors

  • Amirhossein Yousefinya Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
  • Camellia Torabizadeh Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
  • Farid Zand Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
  • Mahnaz Rakhshan Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
  • Mohammad Fararooei Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.iee.v39n2e11

Keywords:

clinical alarms, monitoring, intensive care units, observation, nurses

Abstract


Objective. To evaluate the effects of application of a manual on the improvement of alarms management in Intensive Care Units (ICU).

Methods. This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effectiveness of the introduction into of a manual for alarm management and control in the ICU of a hospital in southeastern Iran. The intervention was a 4-hour workshop was on topics related to the adverse effects of alarms, standardization of ECG, oxygen saturation and blood pressure monitoring systems, and the use of ventilators and infusion pumps. Data were collected thorough 200 hours of observation of 60 ICU nurses (100 hours’ pre-intervention and 100 hours’ post-intervention). Response time, type of response, customization of alarm settings for each patient, the person responding to an alarm, and the cause of the alarm were analyzed. Alarms were classified into three types: false, true and technical.

Results. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-intervention frequency of alarm types, frequency of monitoring parameters, customized monitoring settings for patients, and individuals who responded to alarms. The percentage of effective interventions was significantly higher for all parameters after the intervention (46.9%) than before the intervention (38.9%).

Conclusion. The employment of a manual for management of alarms from electronic equipment in ICUs can increase the frequency of appropriate responses to alarms in these units.

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Author Biographies

Amirhossein Yousefinya , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

nstructor of Nursing, MSN, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email: yousefinya@sums.ac.ir

Camellia Torabizadeh , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

Associate Professor, Ph.D. of Nursing education, Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email: torabik@sums.ac.ir. Corresponding Author

Farid Zand , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

Professor of Critical Care Medicine, MD, Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email: zandf@sums.ac.ir

Mahnaz Rakhshan , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

Associate Professor, Ph.D. of Nursing education, Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email: mzrakhshan@gmail.com

Mohammad Fararooei , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

Professor, Ph.D. of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email: fararooei@yahoo.com

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Published

2021-06-12

How to Cite

Yousefinya , A. ., Torabizadeh , C. ., Zand , F. ., Rakhshan , M. ., & Fararooei , M. . (2021). Effectiveness of application of a manual for improvement of alarms management by nurses in Intensive Care Units. Investigación Y Educación En Enfermería, 39(2). https://doi.org/10.17533/udea.iee.v39n2e11

Issue

Section

ORIGINAL ARTICLES / ARTÍCULOS ORIGINALES / ARTIGOS ORIGINAIS

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